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I recently tried to correct something someone wrote which said:

...it would be a pity, wouldn't it, for example.

Is that actually grammatical? I learned to put anything after a question tag. I don't know if that was because it is bad style or grammatically wrong?

A longer example text would be:

There is a lot of controversy about your company. How do you explain the rumors about it destroying the environment? There is usually more than one side of a story, isn't there, in that case?

  • Could you provide the full sentence? – Element115 Mar 9 '18 at 21:07
  • I thought there might be a rule to not do this at all. That is why I didn´t provide a full sentence. – Marcin Nowak Mar 9 '18 at 21:31
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    It's actually preferable if you provide the whole sentence in the question, that way it becomes clearer what you are asking about. – Element115 Mar 9 '18 at 21:32
  • Marcin - A rule against it? You obviously haven't read through our Details, please meta post. – J.R. Mar 9 '18 at 22:20
  • usually...in that case is incongruous. "usually" is a generality and "that" is specific. usually...in such a case would be OK. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Mar 9 '18 at 23:47
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Given your sentences in the comments:

There is a lot of controversy about your company. How do you explain the rumors about it destroying the environment? ---There is usually more than one side of a story, isn´t there, in that case.

I would say:

There is a lot of controversy surrounding your company. How do you explain the rumors about destroying the environment? Isn't there usually more than one side to a story in that situation?

or

There is a lot of controversy surrounding your company. How do you explain the rumors about destroying the environment? In that situation, isn't there usually more than one side to a story?

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  • The last sentence was actually supposed to be the answer to the question by the second person in the fictive conversation. My bad I guess. – Marcin Nowak Mar 9 '18 at 22:55
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It's perfectly fine to throw around that kind of phrase without ending the sentence or even using a question mark. It just adds emphasis to the statement.

So, you tend to hear it in spoken conversations more often. Something like

I was going to the store, and wouldn't you know it, I saw our old friend Tom

The "wouldn't you know it" is a kind of question, but in context you can tell that the main point this person is trying to get across is that they found an old friend at the store. You wouldn't hear this and think you were actually expected to respond to the embedded question. It's just there to spice up the sentence.

or

You wouldn't be surprised, would you, if I told you he got too drunk"

It's not really a question, simply a statement, and the embedded "would you?" is just there for emphasis

In british english you might hear "innit" (from "isn't it"), as in

It's a nice day, innit?

But it's been used so much in so many situations that it has partially lost it's strict original meaning of "isn't it?" and become something new (and wonderful):

We’re British, Innit.

I was just joking, innit!

It's become a simple marker of emphasis

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