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Example 01

I didn't get up until 10 in the morning, knowing well that my friend was going to leave at 12 noon

I didn't get up until 10 in the morning and knew well that my friend was going to leave at 12 noon.

Example 02

An big earthquake hit yesterday, fortunately just causing little damage and no casualties.

An big earthquake hit yesterday and fortunately just caused little damage and no casualties.

What is the difference in meaning between the sentences in example 01?

What is the difference in meaning between the sentences in example 02?

Is using gerund phases after the end of a sentence equal to using the conjuction "and"?

  • Tᴚoɯɐuo's answer is good but I will point out a minor grammar mistake in your example: It should be "A big earthquake" because A/an is followed by a word that starts with a consonant (big). – rpeinhardt Jan 25 at 22:21
2

He closed the window, knowing that it was about to rain.

He closed the window and knew that it was about to rain.

The windowsill stays dry in either case.

In the first sentence, the participle phrase is presented as the reason for closing the window, as it is the condition that obtains when the act of closing the window is performed.

In the second sentence the action of closing the window and the statement about his foreknowledge are simply presented as side-by-side facts. The order of its facts is rather odd if you wanted the listener to understand that the rain was the reason for closing the window. We would expect:

He knew that it was about to rain and closed the window.

The same oddity occurs with your sentence about your friend's noon departure

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