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  1. The work 'is' to be completed within 1 day.
  2. The work 'has' to be completed within 1 day.
  3. The work to be completed within 1 day.

I have read all three types of sentences but I don't know which one is grammatically right?

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    The third option is not a sentence - there is no main verb. – Canadian Yankee Mar 12 '18 at 20:17
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    To expand on Canadian Yankee's comment, the third one is grammatically correct as a noun phrase within a sentence, like "The pink paper describes the work to be completed within one day." – stangdon Mar 12 '18 at 20:42
  • The first two sentences are grammatical enough. What is your problem with them? – Robusto Mar 12 '18 at 22:07
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The work is to be completed in one day.

This sentence is grammatically correct. It's structure is commonly found in a list of (often legal or professional) requirements. It describes a condition to be met without emotional burden.

The work has to be completed within one day.

This sentence is grammatically correct, but I'm not a fan of the verb phrase "has to." It sounds very colloquial (aka uncouth) to me. To my ear the phrase should read, "the work must be completed within one day." This structure (whether you use "has to" or "must") is commonly found in a verbal exchange when the importance of completing the work on time is emphasized.

The work to be completed within one day

Is an incomplete sentence. For example, it could be used as a compound subject ("The work to be completed within one day is on the east shelves") but without the rest of the sentence we really don't know what the phrase is or could be.

Note that you will find this structure in some legal documents where, once again, we are listing a contractual requirement. However, legal documents utilize the English language in very specific ways that can (and do) break the rules of English grammar. Therefore, we should properly conclude that this phrase is not grammatical.

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    As a counter-argument, "has to" sound perfectly fine to my American ears. But we Yanks are well known for, and often inordinately proud of, being uncouth. – Andrew Mar 13 '18 at 0:16

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