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There is a dance or two in the old dame yet.

What does the sentence exactly mean? The problem might be in the phrase "in the old dame". The meaning of "dame" is "a woman", but the phrase "in the old dame" sounds like a place rather a person.

Context: This was found in a linguistic book:

We have the verb dance as in "Let's dance" and the noun dance as in "There is a dance or two in the old dame yet."

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    Where did you find that quote? Conceivably, it could mean, “This ship can still sail a few more times before she’s mothballed.” It could mean any number of things, depending on the context. – J.R. Mar 13 '18 at 0:29
  • In a linguistic book. "We have the verb dance as in "Let's dance" and the noun dance as in "There is a dance or two in the old dame yet." " – chika Mar 13 '18 at 8:35
  • By the way, is it legal to use another pair of quotation marks in one pair of quotation marks? – chika Mar 13 '18 at 8:37
  • It's legal, but not the way you did it. It should be: "We have the verb dance as in 'Let's dance' and the noun dance as in 'There is a dance or two in the old dame yet.' " More guidance here. – J.R. Mar 13 '18 at 13:53
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Yes, "dame" is an old slang term for a woman. "Old" is probably literal, she's not a young woman, perhaps middle-aged or elderly. Things can be "in" a person just like they can be "in" a place: Literally, you have lungs and kidneys and so forth in you. Metaphorically, you can have love or courage or genius in you. In this case, she has a "dance or two" in her. That is, even though she is getting older, she can still dance. Depending on the context, this might be literal: she's an older woman but she still likes to dance. More likely it's metaphorical: she is still active, perhaps she still seeks romance.

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