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Is the following expression grammatically correct ? If so, does it sound natural ?

I've corrected it, just after I've seen it.

Thanks .

Update :

Here is the scenario :

My friend has sent me an email with a text to correct . So, I have checked the text out after a while from the reception time.

3 Answers 3

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just after I've seen it is a non-starter unless it's referring to something which has not yet taken place.

I will tell you whether I wish to buy your car just after I've seen it.

There, I have not seen your car yet.

So, if you already saw it before you corrected it:

I corrected it, just after I saw it.

I corrected it, just after I had seen it.

The time-expression in a present-perfect construction cannot exclude the present.

The phrases

just after I saw it or just after I had seen it

refer to the past.

So we cannot say:

I have corrected it just after I saw it|just after I had seen it. NO

We must say

I corrected it just after ...

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No, your suggested answer is NOT idiomatic.

The double present perfect doesn't work with just after.

It would be fine to say:

I have seen it and I have corrected it

or

I've seen it and corrected it.

but both of these omit the just after.

Your options in this instance, assuming you want to emphasise the immediacy, are:

I corrected it just after I had seen it.

or

I corrected it just after I saw it

or

I corrected it just after seeing it.

All are idiomatic, with little to choose between them, and just a matter of preference.

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Whenever I have seen it, I have corrected it.

Here is an example which is grammatically correct.

Present tense has current relevance so when you use it as you did it is confusing.

The way I used it makes it sound as if this is a practice of mine that I still engage in. Thus, giving it current relevanc. I hope that helps!

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