3

This is a sentence from a book:

We do not intend here to describe the medieval sense of geographical space in its totality, but briefly to point out some of differences between it and our modern one.

Shouldn't there be the definite article before differences? I thought the sentence reads odd and ungrammatical, and should be rewritten as

We do not intend here to describe the medieval sense of geographical space in its totality, but briefly to point out some of the differences between it and our modern one.

or

We do not intend here to describe the medieval sense of geographical space in its totality, but briefly to point out some differences between it and our modern one.

Am I right?

  • 8
    Yes, you are right. Your cited text hasn't been proofread (either include the, or discard of). – FumbleFingers Mar 15 '18 at 17:45
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    You are correct that the some of construction used here requires the differences between. As you yourself noted, you can avoid the need for a definite article by writing some differences between. And as Lambie said, you could grammatically write differences between although that formulation does not quite convey the same meaning as the other two, which imply that other differences exist, whereas Lambie's formulation neither affirms nor denies that implication. – Jeff Morrow Mar 15 '18 at 18:00
  • Both of your alternatives are correct; the original isn't. – Green Grasso Holm Mar 22 '18 at 17:28
2

Yes, you are exactly right. Neither of your alternatives are clearly better than the other, though I slightly prefer the wordier one.

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