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I am writing this context:

When I come back home I will make a good impression between students about the college which I pursued my master's degree from

I would like to ask you, do I need to place a comma before between?

edit

I have just found another thing.

I haven't pursued my master's degree yet, so would it be more correct to say pursued or would have been pursued?

  • Can you explain a little more about the intent of your sentence? It may help with an answer. Will the students have a good impression of you or of each other? – Nomic Jan 19 '14 at 21:22
2

When I come back home I will make a good impression between students about the college which I pursued my master's degree from.

The sentence is incorrect, e.g. "impression between students".

impression: a strong, favourable, or remarkable effect: he made an impression on the managers.
an effect produced in the mind by a stimulus; sensation: he gave the impression of wanting to help.

So I would say

When I come back home I will make a good impression on students of/about the college in which I am currently pursuing/taking my Master's degree.

(in case you are pursuing it now, and not in the future)
You don't need a comma, except possible after "back home". Commas represent pauses in conversation, so in order to make the text more eligible, you add commas.

For the second question the answer I would say is

When I come back home I will make a good impression on students of the college in which I will have completed Master degree.

  • And if between was the correct preposition, there would be no comma, unless you want to put it after "home": "When I come back home, I will start a lot of arguments between students about which college I got my master's degree from." – J.R. Jan 20 '14 at 12:34

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