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The sentence with the phrase that puzzles me is from the journal Psychology Today Here it goes:

Data has long shown that predictability and control (link is external) can lessen our physical stress response and our associated feelings of upset. Without being so rigid as to set yourself up to be thrown off if things don't go exactly as planned, come up with a specific strategy that outlines what your interaction will be like.

What does as to mean there? I feel that the word as might be redundant there. Could you please rephrase the whole sentence with the phrase for me?

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    It's part of the construction so [adjective] as to [unmarked infinitive verb], which in something like He's so mean as to save and re-use clingfilm is equivalent to He's so mean that he saves and re-uses clingfilm. Mar 19, 2018 at 19:29

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Without being so rigid as to [verb phrase]

This is part of a formulaic comparator, one that is used with a verb phrase. Another way of saying the same thing would be:

Without being so rigid that you [verb phrase]

as in

Without being so rigid that you set yourself up to be thrown off if things don't go exactly as planned ...

Here it is in a simpler sentence:

Don't eat so much as to give yourself indigestion.
Don't eat so much that you give yourself indigestion.

Etc.

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