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What's the correct construction when the go ends with a punctuation? Example:

At the alleyway they'd agreed to go (to), Mary spotted many tiny bars.

Is the "to" needed? Why or why not?

1 Answer 1

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At the alleyway they'd agreed to go

This by itself is a complete sentence. It means that while in the alleyway, they agreed to go.

Marry spotted many tiny bars

This is also a complete sentence.

The issue with removing "to" from this sentence is the punctuation. Without the "to", the comma would need to be a semicolon to divide the two sentences. This would, however, change the meaning of the sentence.

With sentences like these, it sometimes helps to reorder them. For example,

At the alleyway they'd agreed to go to, Mary spotted many tiny bars.

becomes

Mary spotted many tiny bars at the alleyway they'd agreed to go to.

"they'd agreed to go to" is using "to" to specify the alley as a destination, not some other feature of "to." Removing it would result in a sentence like "I will go your house" or "You go the wrong way" which are both wrong because go is rarely used in a transitive sense (when it is, it usually means to choose or buy something, but it is informal). The transitive meaning of "go" does not work here, so the "to" is required.

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