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They are going to come here for the celebration. AND,
They are to come here for the celebration.

Is there any difference?

I am clear with the phrase "going to" with other things (such as going to happen etc.) But if ultimately it's coming, why going and then coming! To me, going to come seemed redundant but then it's very very popular with native speakers. COCA gives thousands of such results.

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    It's unfortunate I suppose that one of the English future forms uses "go". It's best to think of this as a supporting auxiliary and not "go" in the literal sense of "walk/travel to" etc. Using "going to + verb" is much more common than the more formal "to be + to infinitive". – JMB Jan 20 '14 at 10:59
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    If you think that's redundant, how about "I'm going to go now"? :-) – Steve Melnikoff Jan 20 '14 at 14:43
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This particular usage of going to is something that can be easily mistaken to be grammatically incorrect because of the seemingly contrasting meaning of "go" & "come".

However if you look at the definition of "going to" here, here, here or here you will realize that meaning of "going to" has nothing to do with the meaning of "go".

"Going to" is a grammatical construct that refers to some planned actions in the future. It is somewhat similar (though not exactly) in meaning to "plan to".

So They are going to come here can be inferred as they plan to come here.

General structure of the sentence using "going to" is:

Subject + forms of be(is, was etc) + going to + infinitive verb.

So a sentence like "I am going to come" is grammatically correct, although a little awkward to say!!

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"They are going to come here for the celebration." This sentence means that, as far as you know, at the time of the celebration they will come to this place.

"They are to come here for the celebration." This sentence means that, at the time of the celebration they are supposed to come to this place. It probably has undesired connotations of requiring them to come here, and you probably mean the first sentence.

(This is my first answer on ELL, so I hope it isn't too shabby)

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