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Here is a piece of text from the book on which I'm learning English:

Now, tell me how you've been. Just because Molly sent me here for something else, doesn't mean she'll accept me not asking you a few more questions.

Could you explain me (or give the name/link to a rule describing the topic), why there is that "me not asking" there? Isn't there should be "my not having been asked" instead? I.e.:

Just because Molly sent me here for something else, doesn't mean she'll accept my not having asked you a few more questions.

  • I think you mean "my not having asked" as the been makes it passive and this is at cross purposes with the "you" rather than "by you" that follows it. – Paul Childs Mar 21 '18 at 12:46
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    Allow me to point out (so you'll remember): explain to me, explain x to someone//an excerpt from a text in a book. – Lambie Mar 21 '18 at 13:56
  • @Lambie I'd like to ask a question about your words. Is Allow my pointing out... also correct instead of your expression, Allow me to point out...? – Smart Humanism Mar 21 '18 at 14:52
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    Allow me is let me. So, at the beginning of a sentence, it would not work. Let me saying....see what I mean? Let me say that [etc.]. However, it might appear as: they did allow my pointing out through my lawyer that the sale was illegal. – Lambie Mar 21 '18 at 15:09
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    If you want to point something to someone, you say: Allow me to point out that I disagree with you. You wouldn't say: Allow my pointing out that I disagree with you. The set expression is: allow me to [infinitive] – Lambie Apr 3 '18 at 20:26
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Just because Molly sent me here for something else, doesn't mean she'll accept my/me not asking you a few more questions.

No is the simple answer. Both the genitive pronoun "my" and the accusative "me" are fine.

The sequence my/me not asking you a few more questions is a gerund-participial clause with the pronoun as subject.

The choice between genitive and accusative depends largely on style, with the genitive being characteristic of formal style (and overall relatively infrequent, I believe).

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"me" rather than "my" emphasis Molly's potential disapproval is felt to be directed at the person rather than just the lack of questioning. The former thus explains the speakers motivation more strongly.

  • I don't get your point. Could you put it in a more detailed way? – Smart Humanism Mar 21 '18 at 15:03
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    When "me" is used it is stronger as the object of not accepting isn't just an abstract action but also the person doing it. It's like the difference between "I don't like that you did x" and "I don't like you doing x". The latter is more likely to make the hearer take it personally and feel "(s)he doesn't like me" – Paul Childs Mar 21 '18 at 20:38

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