1

Assume that I used the word "tasks" and task in the context before. Then, Do I need to use "the" before "tasks" in the following sentences?

A few number of the tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

All the tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

The N value (or amount) of the execution of the tasks can be cancelled.

The execution of every the task takes 10 units of time.

The number of the tasks in this case equals 10.

In this case, the tasks are T1 to T10.

Thank.

  • A few number of (the) tasks, a few tasks, all tasks, all (of) the tasks, the 8th value of the tasks. – Damkerng T. Jan 20 '14 at 21:14
  • You should use "the"; "tasks" without "the" implies tasks in general, not the tasks that you have previously mentioned. Of note, it is "A few of the tasks", not "A few number", and "every one of the tasks", "each of the tasks", "A number of the tasks". – nxx Jan 20 '14 at 21:54
  • These are not sentences; these are sentence fragments. It might be easier to understand this if you tried to form a complete sentence. – J.R. Jan 20 '14 at 22:47
  • @J.R. I hope these sentences help you to understand my question. – Finder Jan 20 '14 at 23:19
2

Good question! Both of these are grammatical and understandable, and it would be hard to find any significant difference in their meaning:

All the tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.
All tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

However:

A few number of the tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

should be changed to:

Few tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

or:

A small number of tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.
A small number of the tasks should be executed at the maximum supply voltage.

Once again, the inclusion or omission of the article makes only a slight difference. In either case, as a reader, I'm assuming that some set of tasks needs to be executed, and some small subset of those tasks needs to be executed at high voltage.

The word the makes it clear that the author is referring to some specific list of tasks mentioned or listed elsewhere (like in a test plan, for example). The omission of the word the allows for a broader interpretation; some tasks will be executed, but these tasks aren't necessarily specified or named anywhere.

  • You might want to use total instead of value, and I'm not really sure about what cancelled means in this context. In any case, the "the" is optional again, but I'd probably leave it in: The total of the tasks can be cancelled. – J.R. Jan 21 '14 at 8:44
  • @J.R.Thank for your help. Assume the execution time of the whole tasks on a processor is for example 20 seconds. But we can only cancel 5 seconds of the execution time of them (to achieve energy saving). Then, for brevity if we can eliminate the word "execution time", which of the following sentences is correct: "The value of the tasks that cannot be canceled on the processor is 15 seconds" or "value of the tasks that cannot be canceled on the processor is 15 seconds" and or the value of tasks that cannot be canceled on the processor is 15 seconds" – Finder Jan 21 '14 at 9:36
  • I think you are using the word cancelled wrong. I wouldn't say, "We can only cancel 5 seconds to save energy." Instead, "We can only reduce the time by 5 seconds" (or maybe, "We can only shave 5 seconds off the execution time"). Also, I wouldn't use value when talking about time. I realize this doesn't answer your question about using articles, but I would say: "The processing time can only be reduced by 5 seconds; 15 seconds cannot be eliminated from the processing time." But in your format, use the "the": The minimum time of task execution, after optimal energy savings, is 15 sec. – J.R. Jan 21 '14 at 9:50
  • @J.R.OK.Then I found that my sentence can be in this format: The minimum time of tasks execution that cannot be cancelled on the processor is 15 seconds. – Finder Jan 21 '14 at 10:47
  • tasks execution or the execution of tasks is also for me a problem. – Finder Jan 21 '14 at 11:02

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