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Do the following words: (Tension), (Nervous), (Stressed) carry the same contextual meaning? Can they be used interchangeably?

This is what (Online Cambridge English Dictionary) states:

nervous
worried and anxious:
Do you feel/get nervous during exams?
I was too nervous to speak.

stressed
worried and nervous:
The kids are sick, I just lost my baby-sitter, and our toilet doesn’t work – no wonder I feel stressed-out!

tension
a feeling of nervousness before an important or difficult event:
You could feel the tension in the room as we waited for our exam results.

Is there any difference in using these words grammatically vs. in real life?

closed as off-topic by James K, Stephie, Lamplighter, user3169, Varun Nair Mar 26 '18 at 6:46

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    Ok... Now put that information in the question, not in a comment. Use the edit. Then use a dictionary. look up the meaning of each word and then, if the dictionary definitions don't help, come back and edit to write down all that you've found out. If the dictionary is hard to understand, tell us why. Please use the edit button to add more information. – James K Mar 24 '18 at 7:22
  • Welcome to ELL! Now that you've added what you found in the dictionary, I can see how those definitions would make it hard to know which word to use. We don't limit questions to just native speakers though. We have some very fluent non-native speakers in our community and sometimes they can explain things better than a native speaker can because they've been in your shoes! I'm going to edit that part out of your question, but I do think that this is a pretty good first effort. – ColleenV Mar 24 '18 at 12:06
  • You didn't say what your context is. The dictionary examples you gave? Specific examples would be needed to determine if the words are interchangeable. – user3169 Mar 24 '18 at 22:07
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Based on your examples, the primary difference is where the source of the condition is, internal (yourself) or external (caused by something/someone else that affects you).

Do you feel/get nervous during exams? (internal or external)
I was too nervous to speak. (internal)

then

The kids are sick, I just lost my baby-sitter, and our toilet doesn’t work – no wonder I feel stressed-out! (clearly external)

and

You could feel the tension in the room as we waited for our exam results. (this is an environmental observation that could be ones personal concern or also the concern of others)

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