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By using 'it-cleft', can I rewrite the first sentence as the second one?

  1. Learning can help us experience the beauty of the world.
  2. It is the beauty of the world that we can experience by the help of learning.
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  • It's OK, but you permuted your focus. Mar 24 '18 at 13:29
  • Um, @LucianSava, isn't a shift in focus the main point of a cleft structure? Mar 24 '18 at 18:38
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Yes, you can do that.  You can also do better.  I'd like you to consider other options: 

 

It is the beauty of the world that learning can help us experience. 

This option is an it-cleft transformation of the original that doesn't change anything else.  In this version, "learning" is still the subject of "can help", "us" remains its object, and the original object complement "[to] experience the beauty of the world" can easily be reconstructed by recognizing the antecedent of the relative pronoun "that". 

 

Your version contains several other changes.  "Learning" is no longer the subject of any clause.  Instead, it is the object of the preposition "of".  "Us" is no longer the object of anything.  Instead, "we" is the subject of "can experience".  The modal auxiliary "can" no longer applies to the verb "help".  Instead, it applies to the verb "experience".  The verb "help" has vanished entirely.  Instead, the noun "help" acts as the object of the preposition "by" -- which also does not appear in the original. 

None of these changes are wrong.  Only one of them seems awkward or unnatural to me. 

 

It is the beauty of the world that we can experience through the help of learning. 

This option differs from yours by a single word. 

We do use the preposition "by" to express concepts like agency and manner.  A sentence like "I learn by watching and listening" is perfectly natural and ordinary.  However, we also use "by" to express concepts like location and proximity.  We see this in sentences like "I'm standing by the road". 

When the object of "by" is a gerund, the natural interpretation is closer to manner.  When it's a noun, the natural interpretation is closer to proximity

There are other prepositions which also express concepts like agency and manner, and that naturally express those concepts even when their objects are simply nouns.  "With" and "through" are good choices for this purpose. 

 

Alternately, if we eliminate "help" entirely instead of replacing the verb with the noun, we find that "by" remains a natural choice: 

It is the beauty of the world that we can experience by learning. 

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No, the second sentence is awkward and emphatic. It will also change the meaning.

The second sentence excludes other ways of experiencing the beauty of the world, but first sentence does not.

Learning can help us experience the beauty of the world.
--Well, skiing can too!

It is the beauty of the world that we can experience by the help of learning.
--Indeed. Learning is the thing that gets us to experience beauty.

These are different.

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