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The difficulty is going to be finding enough supply to meet the demand.
Source: Skills for Success, published by Oxford

I know after going to we need a simple verb but also I think it should've been like below

The difficulty is going to find enough supply to meet the demand.

And also find is always a verb.

Are there more examples?

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  • The first example is better, but you didn't group the phrase properly. "The difficulty is [going to be] finding enough supply to meet the demand." The going to in your first (better) phrase is about difficulty and not about finding. Mar 24 '18 at 21:57
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    "Find" is not always a verb (e.g. "the find of the century").
    – m_a_s
    Mar 24 '18 at 22:04
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    In the second sentence, it sounds like the difficult is the agency that's going to be doing the action of finding enough supply. Mar 24 '18 at 22:04
  • So, 'finding' here is an adjective? I dont think so bcz still I am in 'find' is always a verb
    – Farid S
    Mar 24 '18 at 22:10
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    No, finding is a gerund there. Mar 24 '18 at 22:49
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The "going to be" refers to the difficulty.

"Finding" is a gerund here - it is connected to the simple verb "be", rather than as a phrase "be finding".

The sentence could be rephrased as:

The difficulty is going to be: how to find enough (...)

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The original sentence:

The difficulty is going to be finding enough supply to meet the demand.

The difficulty is going to be what? It's going to be finding enough supply to meet the demand. Treat the whole thing as a noun phrase. That's what the difficulty is going to be—finding enough supply to meet the demand. This is what the sentence looks like structurally:

A is going to B.

Where A is the difficulty and B is finding enough supply to meet the demand. This is in principle the same thing as this:

I'm going to be a police officer.

Where A is I and B is a police officer.

Now, let's make the example more closely resemble your original sentence:

The problem is going to be becoming a police officer.

Though, I should warn you that the phrasing feels a little bit unnatural. It would be better to switch the order:

Becoming a police officer is going to be the problem.

Finding enough supply to meet the demand is going to be the difficulty.


Your second sentence:

The difficulty is going to find enough supply to meet the demand.

It sounds like the difficulty is the entity that's going to do the finding of enough supply to meet the demand. But that makes no sense since the difficulty is not a person. So, to be perfectly honest, the sentence is not a good one.

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Something is a difficulty. What? A task. What task? The task of finding something. "Finding something" is a phrase that of which the grammatical function is the same as a noun.

The fact that the difficulty in is the future, means that it is described as a difficulty that is "going to be". Those words are another way in English of referring to the future.

So, what we have is: in the future, finding enough, will be a difficulty.

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  • I see, okay without 'be' it doesn't make enough sense. and it's a ground and also it's not a phrasal verb. Can you give me more example of this?
    – Farid S
    Mar 24 '18 at 22:42
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The complement of BE can be a quality or condition:

Is she going to BE happy?

The difficulty is going to be evident.

The difficulty is going to be insurmountable.

The complement of BE can be a noun or nominal:

She is going to BE an astronaut.

Gerunds like finding have nominal status:

The difficulty is going to be finding a solution.

Finding enough money to pay the mortgage is going to be the difficulty.

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