1

Of course, you can also choose to have your grades emailed to you.

In the above sentence, what is the grammatical role of "have"? What is the name of the grammar structure? I expect to see "be emailed to you" but the simple form of "email" is used.

  • I fixed the mistake: emailed. To have something done [past participle] for you. – Lambie Mar 26 '18 at 22:17
2

It should be "Of course, you can also choose to have your grades emailed to you."

Looking at this dictionary entry http://www.dictionary.com/browse/have , it seems to be definition 6

to cause to, as by command or invitation

or possibly 4

to experience, undergo, or endure, as joy or pain:

This is a causative structure; see https://www.espressoenglish.net/causative-verbs-in-english-let-make-have-get-help/

HAVE = Give Someone Else The Responsibility To Do Something
Grammatical structure:

HAVE + PERSON + VERB (base form) HAVE + THING + PAST PARTICIPLE OF VERB

Examples of grammatical structure #1:

I’ll have my assistant call you to reschedule the appointment.
The businessman had his secretary make copies of the report.

Examples of grammatical structure #2:

I’m going to have my hair cut tomorrow.
We’re having our house painted this weekend.
Bob had his teeth whitened; his smile looks great!
My washing machine is broken; I need to have it repaired.

  • Looks like a typo to me, too – J.R. Mar 26 '18 at 21:24
  • Here is the original voice of that sentence: clyp.it/fiq3frqy Do you believe the speaker has made a mistake regarding the "emailed? – PHPst Mar 26 '18 at 21:33
  • The speaker definitely said "...emailed to you," but the d at the end of "emailed" has been almost completely elided into the t of the word "to." If you listen very carefully, you can hear the vowel sound of the syllable "ed" at the end of "emailed." – Canadian Yankee Mar 26 '18 at 21:37
  • @CanadianYankee That's right. I hear it. – PHPst Mar 26 '18 at 21:45

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