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This question already has an answer here:

The envoy could potentially seek Chinese commitment for future support should North Korea’s talks with rivals fall through.

In this sentence, what does the "should" mean for?

Here's the source.

marked as duplicate by Michael Rybkin, Nathan Tuggy, Varun Nair, ColleenV Mar 28 '18 at 17:18

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This is called a subjunctive form in a conditional sentence or, in simpler language, inversion with should. For the purposes of better comprehension, that should can be more or less harmlessly substituted with the conjunction if and the meaning, basically, won't change. For example, these two statements are semantically equivalent:

Should a problem arise, call me immediately.

If a problem arises, call me immediately.

Your sentence:

The envoy could potentially seek Chinese commitment for future support should North Korea's talks with rivals fall through.

The envoy could potentially seek Chinese commitment for future support if North Korea's talks with rivals fall through.

I would be lying if I said that there is no difference between how should and if are used in these sentences. Should as used here, as I previously mentioned, is a subjunctive and as such it's used for expressing a hypothetical state (something that's hypothetical might be true under certain conditions, but generally is not) or a state contrary to reality such as a wish, a desire or an imaginary situation. In this case, I think we're talking about a situation that's hypothetical: something can possibly happen provided that something else happens first. In other words, there is a possibility that the envoy will be seeking Chinese commitment for future support if North Korea's talks with rivals fall through.

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