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Let me introduce an example:

We want to combine

We decide whether or not to rebuild our schedule via her lesson time.

and

We decide whether or not to buy a new phone via her lesson time.

Hence, I made them as one sentence

We decide whether or not to rebuild our schedule and whether or not to buy a new phone via her lesson time, respectively.

We decide whether or not to rebuild our schedule and to buy a new phone via her lesson time, respectively.

We decide whether or not to rebuild our schedule and buy a new phone via her lesson time, respectively.

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Your third formulation implies that "rebuilding our schedule" and "buying a new phone" is a single decision -- either both, or neither.

The first formulation allows for the possibility that you might decide to do either, both, or neither.

The second formulation falls somewhere in between.

The of "via" in these sentences is confusing, as is "respectively". You probably mean "we must make two decisions: whether to buy a new phone, and whether to rearrange our schedule. Both of these decisions will depend on how much time she spends on her lessons."

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I'm sorry, I don't understand your sentences, particularly what you mean by "via her lesson time." But when you combine verbs preceded by "to", it's common to omit the "to" after the first verb. "I'm going to bathe my daughter and put her to bed."

  • via her lesson time means: if her lesson time is short, then ~~~. If her lesson time is a bit short, ~~~~~. Like these. – Danny_Kim Mar 28 '18 at 3:00
  • "Via" means "by way of" or "by means of". Examples: to travel from Germany to Italy via Switzerland; to achieve success in business via careful management. – Green Grasso Holm Mar 28 '18 at 3:06

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