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I rarely understand "otherwise" meaning in this sentence. I think it's not normal meaning(in circumstances different from those present or considered; or else).

please tell me what this mean.

this is full passage

While many teachers say they are keen on the idea of participatory pedagogy, they often have little understanding of what participatory practices entail, and are, in fact, impervious / inimical to change; even when they think they are doing otherwise, observations show that teachers perpetuate the teacher-centered classroom practices to which they have been habituated.

thank in advanced

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Yes it's a less common meaning: differently

Teachers intend to do one thing, in fact believe that they are succeeding in doing that thing, but objective observe see that in fact they do the opposite.

It's complicated by the intended action being a negative, they intend not to be teacher-centric.

So they think they do not use teacher-centred practices, but do use teacher-centred practices; they do otherwise. They do the opposite of what they intend and believe they are doing.

We could recast the meaning as

Teachers think they are using child-centred practices, but observations show that they are in fact using teacher-centered practices.

Teachers think they are using child-centred practices, but observations show something different.

Teachers think they are using child-centred practices, but observations show otherwise.

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  • thank for your great answer ! I understood very easily ! – Sangho Ju Mar 28 '18 at 15:03
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The sentence means: "...even when they think they are not making it a teacher-centered classroom, observations show that teachers perpetuate this practice to which they have been habituated."

The use of "otherwise" in this sentence is, as was rightly pointed out, uncommon or confusing for first timers which means "except (or opposite) for (of) what has just been (or what will soon be) mentioned".

Please refer to this link for an otherwise incomplete usage info :P

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