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Here I have the following paragraph, (this is from the beginning of paragraph)

Of these approaches, the model driven categories opt for pre-defined model libraries (AAA, 1999; BBB, 1998). Among other changes are the recent presentations of a building reconstruction approach by CCC (2010) adopting Bayesian Decision rule to optimize parametric blocks placed on 2D-supports, and an introduction of generative statistics by DDD (2013) to a reconstruction scheme, where pre-defined primitives have been combined and merged into an entire roof.

[Here, AAA, BBB,CCC and DDD are names of the researchers]

My questions are, in academic writing, is it common to start a sentence (actually a paragraph) with OF and does this paragraph is well accepted even in higher impact factor journals.

or any suggestion from Native English speakers are also welcome, because I have been recommended to get their support.

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    Starting with “of” seems fine to me for academic writing. – Tyler James Young Jan 21 '14 at 19:12
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It is absolutely correct to start a sentence with "of" in academic writing (or any English prose). We can always begin a sentence with a conjunction. The form of the first sentence in your paragraph is:

Conjunction with a dependent clause ("Of these approaches") followed by main clause ("the model driven categories opt for pre-defined model libraries (AAA, 1999; BBB, 1998).")

It is a correct sentence.

(I also note that this form is used to begin many paragraphs in James Berger's scholarly paper about Bayesian analysis.)

There is a grammatical error in the second sentence in your paragraph, though:

adopting Bayesian Decision rule to optimize

should read:

adopting the Bayesian Decision rule to optimize (if there is one Bayesian Decision rule)

or

adopting Bayesian Decision rules to optimize (if there are more than one Bayesian Decision rule)

Edit to answer your question below:

It is good flow (continuation) and correct to start the second sentence with "Among other changes". "Among" tells us there are more changes beyond the changes discussed in sentences 1 and 2. "Other changes" also clarifies that sentence 1 and sentence 2 are about different changes.

If we left out "Among other changes are", then the reader would face some confusion:

  1. It may not be clear that the building reconstruction approach by CCC in sentence 2, is not part of the pre-defined model libraries in sentence 1.
  2. It may not be clear how the building reconstruction approach by CCC in sentence 2 is related to the pre-defined model libraries in sentence 1.

(Sentence 2 would also lack a subject and verb!)

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  • thank you for good answer with examples. Also, it helps if you tell about this phrase "Among other changes are the recent presentations of a building reconstruction approach ..." is also fully agree with academic journal papers? why it is written like that, is it just to get continuation or ..? thanks again – gnp Jan 22 '14 at 2:28
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    No problem! I edited my answer to address "Among other changes". – Tamara Jan 22 '14 at 3:27

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