1

Here’s an interesting thought. If glaciers started reforming, they have a great deal more water now to draw on — Hudson Bay, the Great Lakes, the hundreds of thousands of lakes of Canada, none of them / which existed to fuel the last ice sheet — so they would grow very much quicker. And if they did start to advance again, what exactly would we do?

The correct usage in the above sentence is "which" in a grammar book. However, I think both "them" and "which" are correct. Am I wrong?

0

Consider:

Of the Hudson Bay, the Great Lakes, the hundreds of thousands of lakes of Canada, none of them existed to fuel the last ice sheet.

Hudson Bay, the Great Lakes, the hundreds of thousands of lakes of Canada, none of which existed to fuel the last ice sheet.

in your phrase which sounds better as it works in the subjective clause between your hyphens.

-1

Well, to me i think 'them' should be instead of 'which'. Take for example typing on computer if any of these words: who, whose, whom, where, how, when or which is written, the computer will require you to put the question sign(?) otherwise it underlines the sentence as not properly constructed. Though some people say either of the two words can be used in sentences like that.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.