0

I understood this sentence's context. but I can't understand which is correct verb.

in this part, "and his rating are higher the more dangerous his exploits appear to be".

I thought are and appear are both verb. but there is no conjunction between them. what am I suppose to do here?

please tell me how to understand this sentence.

A television journalist often travels to dangerous countries all over the world because he is contractually obligated to do so, and his ratings are higher the more dangerous his exploits appear to be.

  • How or in what manner are his rating higher? The more dangerous his exploits appear to be. That's how they are higher. And the phrasing definitely makes it sound like the only way for him to get his ratings higher is only when his exploits appear to be more dangerous. – Michael Rybkin Mar 29 '18 at 15:13
1

structure: [..]his ratings are higher the more dangerous x appears to be.

The more dangerous x appears to be, the higher are his ratings. [usual order of this type of comparison. The order in your sentence is an alternative order.]

The funnier the joke, the greater are the reactions.

The usual structure is: the [comparative] the Y, the [comparative] [are/is] Y.

The greater the challenge, the sweeter the victory.

Often, there is no verb. However, the verb to be can be used:

The greater the challenge, the sweeter is the victory.

And the verb can go at the end:

The greater the challenge, the sweeter the victory is.

  • Another syntax is shown by "The funnier the joke, the louder the people laugh". That is, the order of items in the second clause is "the", comparative, subject, verb. IME this is the usual order. Unless , that is, the comparative is an adjective that qualifies the subject. For example, "The better the reviews, the more people will buy them." – Rosie F Mar 29 '18 at 16:36
  • Yes, the are or is can go at the end too. The greater the challenge, the sweeter the victory is. I have added that to my answer. Thanks. – Lambie Mar 29 '18 at 16:59

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.