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I was about to use the phrase "I'm worth your trust" in a company document, when I happened upon this EnglishForums post, where a poster calls the expression "borderline acceptable."

Is there a problem with this expression? Does it sound strange? If so, what would be more acceptable alternatives?

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  • It sounds slightly strange but as the other person said, 'borderline acceptable'. – JDF Mar 31 '18 at 11:57
  • @Deonyi what would you suggest as a better alternative? – Tin Man Mar 31 '18 at 11:58
  • Google "worthy of your trust" and "worth your trust", and check to see if the people using some of the examples sound competent. – Edwin Ashworth Mar 31 '18 at 12:02
  • It seems at least a few reputable sources (though not many) do use "worth your trust": npr.org/2014/10/03/353292500/… , lifehack.org/607801/how-to-tell-if-someone-is-worth-your-trust – Tin Man Mar 31 '18 at 12:06
  • That said, I'm a bit alarmed by its low usage frequency. – Tin Man Mar 31 '18 at 12:12
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Normal usage would be:

I'm worthy of your trust.

when you want the other party to trust you.

I'm worth your trust.

might be acceptable, but comes across as making a self-important valuation of yourself, as in

I'm worth the $50,000 you are paying me.

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