1

Can I leave out the second was?

1- The little animal was alert and quiet but was caught nonetheless.

2- The little animal was alert and quiet but caught nonetheless.

2

No. If you leave out the second was, it sounds like the little animal caught some other animal.

It may help to think about this scenario in the present tense:

1 - The little animal is alert and quiet but gets caught nonetheless.

2 - The little animal is alert and quiet but catches nonetheless.

2 doesn't really make sense, since it doesn't mention what the little animal catches.

  • Thanks tjp. I understand the analogy is meant to illustrate an idea by a similar example. One could say: how about:*The little animal is alert and quiet but caught nonetheless*. I admit your examples made me reconsider my writing. – learner Apr 1 '18 at 1:21

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