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I think the project is conducted for the intention X, and as a member I need to know if any other intention is -----.

I think the project is conducted for the intention X, and as a member I need to know if there is any other intention -----.

What word/words to put in the blank. I like to use "involved" or "involved in it". Is it correct to use "involved" without "in it"? In general, which of the above sentences are prefered?

  • The second one seems correct to me. I think the project is conducted for the intention X, and as a member I need to know if there is any other intention. And there is no need to append any word after. – Anoop Mysore Apr 3 '18 at 11:23
  • I might just say "any other reason for it." It seems more clear to me. In any case, I think I would use for it rather than in it, and wouldn't feel the need to find another verb. – BobRodes Apr 3 '18 at 11:41
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    Referring to my business-study and project-managment, the whole expression sounds weird. One reason: An experiment will be conducted for the purpose of finding out more about..... Another reason: A project has goals and proceeds different stages. In stage 1, you define goals, requirements, risks ect.. – FrankMK Apr 3 '18 at 12:01
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    "conducted for the intention X" sounds really weird. It's understandable, but very non-idiomatic. More fluent would be "conducted with the intention of X". – stangdon Apr 3 '18 at 12:09
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The second option is fine without any word.

The first option could be completed with present or involved, but either way it's a slightly awkward wording. Not incorrect, and not something that would mark someone out as a non-native speaker, but as someone who doesn't have the trick of forming elegant sentences (or at least hasn't applied that trick in this case).

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