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There is a famous saying:

A day without a laughter is a day wasted.

Can I replace it with the following?

A day without a laughter is a wasted day.

Could you tell me the difference between the two sentences, if any?

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Take the two sentences:

  1. A day without laughter is a day wasted.

  2. A day without laughter is a wasted day.

On the surface, they mean exactly the same thing. Switching "wasted" and "day" doesn't change the literal meaning.

At the same time, the first sentence is more memorable because it uses the poetic technique of repetition (i.e. "A day... is a day...") for emphasis. I'm calling it a poetic technique, since it requires inverting the normal English adjective + noun pattern to accomplish.

The second sentence expresses the same sentiment in regular prose.

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