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Is there any difference between 'just as' and 'just like'? For example if I say:

i. Prevention is good; just like, it is good to take green tea.
ii. Prevention is good; just as, it is good to take green tea.

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    This doesn’t answer your question, but I don’t think that’s well-punctuated. Instead, I’d go with: Prevention is good – just as it is good to take green tea. – J.R. Apr 5 '18 at 6:54
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Yes there is a difference, but very subtle and no one would really notice in everyday english

i. Prevention is good; just like, it is good to take green tea.

"Like" implies a comparison. This is comparing "taking green tea" to "preventing something" like an illness.

ii. Prevention is good; just as, it is good to take green tea.

There is no comparison here. "As" is a simply conjunction linking the two phrases. This could be treated more sequentially, prevention is good, making green tea is good. The adverb "just" trivializes the making of tea, they are simply two phrases.

However, in the second sentence, there is an implicit link in that the phrases are said near each other. But in the first sentence, the word "like" brings the readers attention to the comparison, the connection between the phrases.

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