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At schools, teachers won't use chalk on a blackboard.
At school, teachers won't use chalk on a blackboard.

Are above two sentences both grammatically correct? The only difference is the second one is using singular form school.

If the intention is to express the meaning in any school, teachers will not need to use chalk any more in future, which one is better?

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You are addressing masses in general. So,

At schools, teachers don't use chalks on a blackboard (anymore).

Note that when you are referring to a 'general truth,' a base verb is preferred. This is because the 'general truth' is not time bound.

Something like -

Parents take their children to amusement parks in vacations

over

Parents will take their children to amusement parks in vacations


Note: I may prefer 'in schools' though!

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    In US English, chalk is usually treated as a mass noun, so I’d be more likely to hear: teachers don't use chalk on a blackboard. – J.R. Apr 5 '18 at 11:08
  • @J.R. I've frequently used color chalks – Maulik V Apr 5 '18 at 11:10
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    I think "color[ed] chalks" is plural because it emphasizes that there are multiple sticks, each in a different color. If you're talking about sticks of chalk in general, regardless of color, then the uncountable singular "chalk" sounds more natural. – Canadian Yankee Apr 5 '18 at 14:40

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