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If I have a long sentence started with "although", can I use "although that" for example after it to connect the reader back to the first "although"?

For example:

Although a standard single-hidden-layer feedforward neural network with N hidden neurons is known to be able to learn N arbitrary distinct samples using almost any activation function, although that, the number of samples usually is very large...

Is the use here correct?

If instead I used "however" like so:

Although a standard single-hidden-layer feedforward neural network with N hidden neurons is known to be able to learn N arbitrary distinct samples using almost any activation function. However, the number of samples usually is very large...

Is this also correct?

2 Answers 2

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There's nothing wrong with:

Although a standard single-hidden-layer feedforward neural network with N hidden neurons is known to be able to learn N arbitrary distinct samples using almost any activation function, the number of samples usually is very large...

You don't need to use any sort of conjunction in this situation.

If you're worried that your sentence is so long that the reader needs a reminder what you're saying halfway through the sentence, then it's probably too long in general and needs to be split up, possibly along these lines:

A standard single-hidden-layer feedforward neural network with N hidden neurons is known to be able to learn N arbitrary distinct samples using almost any activation function. However, the number of samples usually is very large...

In other words, you can use however, but if you do, then you don't also need to use although. You should be aware that some people regard starting a sentence with "however" as incorrect, but it's still a fairly common practice.

Regarding your first sentence, you don't typically follow although with that, unless that happens to be the subject of the clause following although.

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  • Thank you. But if I want to use another "although", instead of "although that", what should I say?
    – ammar
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 5:08
  • @ammarx I don't quite understand what you're asking. Why do you want to use another "although"? In order to use "although," you can either write, "Although [dependent clause], [main clause]" or "[main clause] although [dependent clause]". You don't need another conjunction.
    – godel9
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 5:12
  • @ammarx If you're worried that people will have trouble following the sentence because it's too long, I'm a native speaker, and I have no problem understanding what you're saying without any additional conjunctions.
    – godel9
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 5:14
  • Yes, I understand, but in my comment, I asked for the case of actually lengthy sentence, not the sentence in my question. In that case, is it possible to use "although" as a conjunction?
    – ammar
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 5:18
  • @ammarx Let me know if the latest update addresses your concern.
    – godel9
    Commented Apr 8, 2018 at 5:26
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If I understand your sentence correctly, you wish to say that technique XYZ is theoretically possible, but it involves a lot of work. You can express this in several ways:

technique XYZ is theoretically possible, but it involves a lot of work
technique XYZ is theoretically possible, although it involves a lot of work
technique XYZ is theoretically possible, however it involves a lot of work
technique XYZ is theoretically possible: it does, however, involve a lot of work
although it involves a lot of work, technique XYZ is theoretically possible.

Note that, in all five examples, there is only one conjunction in each sentence. although and however have very similar functions and, when inserted between two clauses to connect them, their meaning is similar to but.

If you start a sentence with although it is necessary to move the second clause to the front, as in the last example.

The first for versions carry the implication that it may not be worthwhile, but the fourth version suggests that it is worthwhile despite the large amount of work required.

It is only necessary or permissible to use that after although as a pronoun or determiner to refer to something mentioned earlier, for example the bold text in the following sentence:

Members have commented, it would be highly desirable for serving heads, deputies and, possibly, even teachers to be on inspection teams, although that would have resource implications - Hansard 1998

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