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I have seen/heard this several times, for instance:

This is my job on the line, and you are gonna talk to me. (Movie Glengarry Glen Ross)

[A]nd it is my job on the line, and hers too. (a book)

It makes me wonder about its grammaticality. Shouldn't it be

It is my job that is on the line.

How should "This is my job on the line." be parsed?

  • Yes, the sentence is perfectly grammatical. You can even say: It is my job that's on the line. – Michael Rybkin Apr 11 '18 at 0:01
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Some call this type of ellipsis whiz-deletion, because it reduces a relative clause starting with a wh- relative pronoun (who, which, what… but also that) and is (or another form of be) by removing them, and if necessary converting the remainder of the clause into another type of modifier.

It is extremely common to reduce relative clauses for brevity and simplicity, particularly in speech, and the quotes you cite are both grammatical and natural.

We will only consider the vendors which are in compliance.
We will only consider the vendors in compliance.

New York is great except for all the New Yorkers who are there.
New York is great except for all the New Yorkers there.

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