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Instead of

I would like to date a girl who is at least of my intellect.

can I say

I would like to date a girl at least of my intellect.

by dropping the phrase "who is"? What I try to mean is:

I would like to date a girl whose intellect level is at least the same as mine.

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In colloquial English the phrase would be I would like to date a girl at least as smart as me. That would mean that you're willing to date girls who are smarter than you as well. You just don't want to be smarter than the girl is.

But you could also say who is my intellectual equal or who is my equal in intelligence if you're looking for equality there.

  • Thanks. What about these two: "I would like to date a girl who is at least of my intellect" and "I would like to date a girl at least of my intellect"? These sentences are also correct and they have the same meaning, right? – Fire and Ice Apr 15 '18 at 15:52
  • No, of my intellect is not idiomatic; it doesn't mean "on my intellectual level". – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 15 '18 at 17:59
  • Would they sound wrong? Wouldn't any native English speakers say them? Should I say "I would like to date a girl at least of my level of intellect" instead, by using the word "level"? – Fire and Ice Apr 15 '18 at 18:09
  • It would not sound right. The girl would be at your intellectual level, not of your level. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 16 '18 at 11:32
  • @ Tᴚoɯɐuo Acccording to the people in wordreference forum, I can use "of" there. – Fire and Ice Apr 16 '18 at 11:51
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It's fine to drop the "who is" in that sentence, but the resulting phrase "a girl at least of my intellect" is clumsy. Possibly better:

I want to date a girl having/with an intellect at least equal to mine.

Still, the more idiomatic expression is "intellectual equal" or, if you must, "of equal intellect":

I want to date a girl of (at least) equal intellect.

I want to date (at least) my intellectual equal.

  • Thanks. Is the first version "I would like to date a girl who is at least of my intellect" clumsy as well to you? – Fire and Ice Apr 15 '18 at 18:18
  • @DereMemo Yes, "of my intellect" is the problem. "My intellectual equal" sounds better. – Andrew Apr 15 '18 at 18:50
  • Thanks. But I have found instances where the authors used "of my intelligence" on Google Books. For example: books.google.com.tr/… – Fire and Ice Apr 19 '18 at 11:03
  • One of the other sentences on Google Books is this: "It was inexcusable for a person of my intelligence to act like that, he said." So, If we can say these, can't we also say "I would like to date a girl at least of my intellect"? – Fire and Ice Apr 19 '18 at 11:05
  • @DereMemo i didn't say you can't say it. I just said it was clumsy. – Andrew Apr 19 '18 at 15:13

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