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I heard a line in the movie The Humbling:

Pegeen: We're doing a contemporary adaptation of Macbeth, and I cannot think of another actor. I'd like to try it out on more than you.

I can't figure out why the character said more than you. I would understand it if the line was I'd like to try it out on you (which means "I'd like to have you try the role") But what does the character mean by more than you?

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    You are parsing it wrong. "(I cannot think of another actor) (I'd like to try it out on more) (than you)." – user3169 Apr 15 '18 at 5:37
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Compare the following:

I can't think of another place I'd like to visit more than it.

We understand that sentence so:

I can't think of another place I'd like to visit more than [I'd like to visit] it.

That place is at the top of my list of places to visit.

Or this:

I can't think of another meal I'd like to eat more than it.

which is understood so:

I can't think of another meal I'd like to eat more than [I'd like to eat] it.

The meal is my favorite meal.

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I think you have a period where it is not supposed to be because it gives two different meanings. But, if it is not a period, it means there is no one more desirable in her mind that she would rather have try the role. If it is a separate sentence then they are saying that they want to try it out on more people but can't think of anymore actors, which is a weird way to say it so it is probably the first way.

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