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I feel like this sentence is grammaticaly incorrect when saying it but I can't find the mistake, or I feel that i could put "at" at the end. So, what is the right thing? Is it the original sentence, or is there is really a mistake, or can i put an "at" at the end?

  • You could feasibly introduce at using the first time at which I listened to this song, but it's unnecessary, and in your exact context it's not really idiomatic. Contexts where the time at which would be more reasonable Do you remember the time at which you woke up this morning?, but even there we'd nearly always use when (and might or might not explicitly include the time). My advice: forget about at in contexts where you're talking about an occasion rather than the (clock-based) time [of day]. – FumbleFingers Apr 17 '18 at 16:22
  • You have a spelling mistake. The word "I" is always capitalised. – James K Apr 17 '18 at 16:42
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The sentence is grammatically correct.

I still remember the first time I listened to this song at.

Would not be correct. You could feasibly say:

I still remember the first time at which I listened to this song.

But it is not really idiomatic in this context. You sentence is fine as it stands. You don't need to use at when you are talking about an occasion rather than a clock based time.

  • I know, but it just felt wierd for me saying it, so I wanted to make sure. Thanks. And I didn't know about the I rule, my phone always capitalize it and I have to get back to write it like that. So, thanks again for letting me know that, and teaching me a new thing. – user74013 Apr 17 '18 at 17:02
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The sentence is grammatical, but I think you're getting confused between two different meanings of time.

The basic meaning is "time on a clock", and at is the appropriate preposition for that meaning.

But in sentences like this, it has a different meaning, "occasion", and we would not use at with it. If it stands as a prepositional phrase, it uses for ("I have just listened to it for the first time"); but in this construction, it doesn't need a preposition at all.

[If you meant "time of day", you would have to make that explicit: "I still remember what time it was when I first listened to this song"].

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