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I speak three languages in which the treatment and use of articles are very different. On the one side I have spanish in which we put articles for everything. On the other hand, I have japanese, where articles simply don't exist. And then there is english, which is in the middle.

For example, spanish speakers would not say "go home". There has to be a "the" somewhere (as in "go to the home").

As a consequence of this, I am having a bit of a problem translating something from japanese and sounding correct in english.

The bit I want to translate is "印字画像について" where 印字 means "print", 画像 means "image" and について means "about"

So this roughly means "About printed image" or "About image to be printed"

Now my question is, does this sound correct? My spanish speaking brain is asking to insert a "the" or an "a" somewhere!

Or can I just leave it at "About image to be printed"?

  • "home" is probably not a good example for reference on article use, since usage of articles between home (that place where our family lives, we return to everyday, and other personalized descriptions) vs. house which refers to the physical structure, is different. – user3169 Apr 20 '18 at 20:07
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Image is a countable noun, and as such it has to take an article or be plural. However, it's impossible to tell you what article is best to use without more context like a complete sentence. It could be any option depending on context. For example,

Let's discuss images to be printed.

This information sheet is about an image to be printed.

The image about to be printed is shown on this screen.

  • Basically I have the sentence: "About image to be printed" as a title, and then a format table which describes the format of the image to be printed. I suppose that I should correct the title to "About the image to be printed" – KansaiRobot Apr 23 '18 at 1:07
  • Yes, if you're talking about one particular image, then I agree with you, "About the image to be printed" sounds best. – stangdon Apr 23 '18 at 14:40

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