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Is this sentence grammatically correct? e.g for a journal paper's title:

Unemployment affects stress, what about the reverse?

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    I'm sure that it's fine as two sentences (Unemployment affects stress. What about the reverse?). I also think that it's fine in informal speech (Unemployment affects stress - what about the reverse?). I'm inclined to believe that, with some punctuation tricks, it might be fine as a title (Unemployment Affects Stress – What about the Reverse?). – Damkerng T. Jan 25 '14 at 14:22
  • @DamkerngT. thanks, your comment is really a good ANSWER. It would be better if you have posted it as one. – Ehsan88 Jan 25 '14 at 16:09
  • If you add since it would be fine: Since Unemployment affects stress, what about the reverse ? – bassrider Jan 25 '14 at 18:41
  • A journal title might be more along the lines of: Investigating the Correlation Between Unemployment and Stress as Both Cause and Effect. or something like that. – Jim Jan 26 '14 at 2:43
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I'm sure that it's fine as two sentences,

Unemployment affects stress. What about the reverse?

I also think that it's fine in informal speech (I often see similar sentences in transcriptions),

Unemployment affects stress – what about the reverse?

I'm inclined to believe that, with some punctuation tricks, it might be fine as a title (I would use it myself),

Unemployment Affects Stress – What about the Reverse?

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I think the topic has its own format(structure).

it can be used in this way ."unemployment affects Stress ?"

Grammatically may be true or false, but here mentioned for a journal title .

But grammatically I think It is better to use "What about the reverse of it ".

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