1

She is the titular Queen but she has neither the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a Queen.

2

No it is not correct.

To correct it, one would have to write:

She is the titular queen but she has neither the authority nor the honour of a queen.

That's to say, both phrases neither the authority and nor the honour have to be objects of the verb has.

Otherwise, you would have to write:

She is the titular queen but she does not have the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen.

Note that unless you were referring to a specific queen, you would not use a capital Q.

https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/questions-and-negative-sentences/neither-neither-nor-and-not-either

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/30075/what-is-the-correct-way-to-use-neither-and-nor-in-a-sentence-together

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  • Thank you very much for answering. Could you please tell me if there is any difference in meaning whether we use "does" or not. And is the following sentence grammatically correct? "She is the titular queen but neither has she had the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen." – Shivam Apr 22 '18 at 9:00
  • 1
    To be consistent, (placing both pronouns behind the verbs) you would have to write: She is the titutal queen but neither has she the authority nor enjoys she the honour of a queen. While this is correct, it's rather archaic and not idiomatic - more suitable for a play or poem. – Ronald Sole Apr 22 '18 at 9:37
  • Thank you so much for the links. They are really informative. Could you please tell me whether this one is acceptable or not : "She is the titular queen but neither has she the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen." – Shivam Apr 22 '18 at 9:55
  • @Shivam I think that your example is grammatical but it is not consistent: You could balance it by saying: *She is the titular queen but she neither possesses the authority nor enjoys the honour of a queen. – Ronald Sole Apr 22 '18 at 15:32
  • Is it not consistent because I have used "does" only with the nor part and not with the neither part? If so, can we balance it this way : "She is the titular queen but neither does she have the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen". Or is it still unbalanced because now we only have "have" only with the "neither" part and not on both sides. – Shivam Apr 24 '18 at 0:55
1

There is another way of correctly phrasing this that has not been mentioned.

She is the titular queen but neither does she have the authority of nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen.

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  • Thank you for the answer. But, could you explain as to why the "of" after authority is necessary. Can't we write, "She is the titular queen but neither does she have the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen". – Shivam Apr 24 '18 at 0:47
  • @Shivam Each phrase has to stand on its own in the absence of the other. You would not say "she has the authority a queen," and the second "of" exists only within the second phrase as I wrote it. (Look at the text in bold.) I could have removed "of" from both phrases but it didn't sound as natural me—I made a style choice not to. – Jason Bassford Apr 24 '18 at 0:57
  • Is this true for all the examples mentioned above? If so, then are the following sentences wrong? (1) ...but she has neither the authority nor the honour of a queen. (2) ...but she doesn't have the authority nor does she enjoy the honour of a queen. (3) ...but neither has she the authority nor enjoys she the honour of a queen. (4) ...but she she neither possesses the authority nor enjoys the honour of a queen. Could you please explain whether these are correct or not. – Shivam Apr 24 '18 at 2:51
  • @Shivam All of the answers are correct. In the other examples, of is used outside of the individual phrases and applies to both. – Jason Bassford Apr 24 '18 at 3:21
  • Thanks for the reply. So, how can I know whether to apply one "of" that covers both the phrases or to apply two "of" separately? – Shivam Apr 24 '18 at 3:24

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