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I lighted upon a sentence on The Huffington Post:

The phrase that reached out and grabbed me this go-round was, “For it’s money they have and peace they lack.”

Merriam Webster defines it as "one of a series of recurring actions or events : round," so does the sentence mean the following? But it doesn't really make sense

The phrase that reached out and grabbed me this time was, “For it’s money they have and peace they lack.”

Edit to add a related question:

this go-round -- what does that mean?

I found @Michael Rybkin's question pertaining to mine. In that question, since the book has gone through several revisions, it makes sense to have several times around, but that doesn't appear to be the case here. The article that contains the sentence I am having trouble with is not about something that requires multiple attempts or rounds. That is the reason it doesn't make sense.

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    But that's what it actually means. Why does it not make sense to you? This go-round means this time. – Michael Rybkin Apr 25 '18 at 7:05
  • @MichaelRybkin Well, obviously I am having similar issues (sort of, related) as you were having with this question: ell.stackexchange.com/questions/118871/… In your question, since the book has gone through several revisions, it makes sense to have several times around, but not in my case. The article I am having trouble with is not about something that requires multiple attempts or rounds. That is the reason it doesn't make sense. – Eddie Kal Apr 25 '18 at 15:15
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You are correct that you could replace go-round with time.

I believe the issue that is causing you trouble, is how far apart the context of the phrase is from where it is used.

In the original article you provided, the author begins with:

I recently sat down and watched the 1989 movie “Field of Dreams” again. For some unexplained reason, it spoke to me louder than it did the first couple of times that I experienced it

As such, they are stating they have done this activity before, and so are having another "go" at it.

This line is multiple paragraphs before the phrase you found, and so it would be extremely easy to miss or forget that they are talking about a movie they have seen before.

Hopefully it is clearer now, along with the dictionary description you posted, that the author is saying:

The phrase that reached out and grabbed me this go-round (as I have watched it before, but didn't notice the deeper meaning of it untill now) was, “For it’s money they have and peace they lack.”

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