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I am sorry for being dumb, but English is not my first language! Which one is correct to say "on" or "in" in the following sentence

I came to the US as a landed immigrant on July 23rd 2013 or I came to the US as a landed immigrant in July 23rd 2013?

which one is correct "on" or "in"?

please let me know. Thanks in advance

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  • We would say 'in' if it was just the month or the year - 'I came in 2013' or 'I came in July 2013'. But when it is more precise, then we use 'on' for the actual day (and we define the day with the definite article, usually) 'I came on the 23rd of July, 2013'. – user63615 Apr 24 '18 at 23:24
  • Thank you for your help Mr. Nigel.... It is clear now :)))) Thanks again – Mona Apr 25 '18 at 0:24
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    Possible duplicate of Published at vs published on? – Mari-Lou A Apr 25 '18 at 6:12
  • What is a "landed immigrant"?? – Lambie Apr 25 '18 at 12:56
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Don't think you're being 'dumb'. Many advanced English learners still make this mistake.

'On' is used for days. Any word with 'day' in it needs 'on'.

on Tuesday, on my birthday, on holiday, etc.

Also if you give a day a name, such as the 2nd of June, you also need 'on'. On the 2nd, on the second of June, on the 2nd of June 1998.

But be careful, if you only use 'June' then you need 'in', because 'in' is used for blocks of time. I hope that helps.

  • Thank you very very much for clarifying this !! and sorry for the spelling mistakes :)...Thanks again – Mona Apr 25 '18 at 0:14

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