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I find this sentence from a book odd:

Their flimsy settlements consequently were soon abandoned, and their discovery was forgotten, except in Scandinavian saga and song.

According to both the Macmillan Dictionary and Cambridge English Dictionary, the word saga is a count noun. I know song can be a mass noun to refer to the idea or activity of singing. So isn't the sentence ungrammatical as written? Shouldn't it be edited to:

Their flimsy settlements consequently were soon abandoned, and their discovery was forgotten, except in Scandinavian sagas and song.

  • The sentence is referring to the class of record in which their discovery is recorded. ...except in...sagas and songs would also be viable. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Apr 25 '18 at 16:49
4

Saga can be a mass noun for the genre of Norse myth.

Settings in saga are but sparse literalisms of terrain: the terse topography of ridge, grazing-ground, woodland clearing or marsh-land. From Poetry, Space, Landscape: Toward a New Theory by Chris Fitter

  • 1
    +1 I think this is probably the answer. Btw, I edited in the source. – Eddie Kal Apr 25 '18 at 15:38
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    Also this applies to myth, legend, romance, opera, drama, and probably others. A drama or the genre of drama. A fiction is a little obsolete. – Michael Harvey Apr 25 '18 at 15:50

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