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I have a confusion with a sentence. Is this sentence correct in grammar-article sense?

"It could've been more thrilling as I was expecting something more at that time."

I have confusion with "as" and "was expecting" and I wonder if there is a mismatch of tenses in the second part.

I wanted to say, "It could have been more money as he is an honest guy". My confusion is if I use past tense on main clause "It could have been..." and use "as", can I use any tense with the subordinate clause starting with "as"

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In contemporary American English, we are far more likely to say since not as in sentences like the following, but as and since are interchangeable:

I wonder who took my last beer from the fridge?
-- It could have been your roommate, since he drinks first and asks questions later.

As you can see, there is no problem following could have been with a present-tense construction in the since-clause or as-clause.

It could have been your roommate, as he drinks first and asks questions later.

The subordinate clause there states a persistent fact which is true now and was true then.

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  • Thank you. So, when I use as or since, it doesn't care much with tense mismatch. Even if I use present or other tense after past tense or past perfect before as or since. Am I right? Apr 26, 2018 at 11:44
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    The explanation presented in the subordinate clause can express a past fact which is no longer true, a present fact which was also true in the past, or a statement about the future. Any of those statements might be offered as an explanation for something that happened in the past. Who was that phone call from? --I don't know. The connection dropped right after I said 'hello'. It could have been my sister, since she will be visiting this afternoon. Apr 26, 2018 at 11:55
  • Thank you so much! I have got it. Now just do me a last favor. The sentence you wrote "It could have been my sister, since she will be visiting this afternoon." . Here subordinate clause is "since she will be visiting this afternoon" and principle clause is "It could have been my sister" Am I right? Apr 26, 2018 at 12:08
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    Yes, there is a main clause which can stand on its own independently (It could have been my sister) and a subordinate clause which depends on or requires the main clause for it to make full sense (since she will be visiting this afternoon). Apr 26, 2018 at 12:26

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