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I've found this turn of speech here: https://bitcointalk.org/index.php?topic=429146.msg4691806#msg4691806

which I'm sure is quite alarming and effective to the average ignorant pleb who is then happy to shell out £100 on a subscription if it means he now has the secrets to hold onto his money when the economy goes arse over tit.

What does it mean "goes arse over tit." ?

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According to Wiktionary, arse over tit means,

(Australia, New Zealand, UK, idiomatic, vulgar) Tumbling; falling; upside-down; unstable or unbalanced.
I missed the step and went arse over tit.

When the economy went that way, it means that it's unstable, tumbling down. It means everything about the economy went wrong.

Another similar phrase, but more common (to me) and less vulgar, is the economy is tumbling down.

Some other similar expressions (but might be used differently, see J.R.'s comment below) are head over heels, base over apex, and topsy-turvy.

  • Is it verbatim means: "Goes to the asshole through chest"? – Anomalous Awe Jan 26 '14 at 16:11
  • I wouldn't think so. I think the example I missed the step and went ... gives you a better picture. – Damkerng T. Jan 26 '14 at 16:29
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    It means ass (not asshole) went over breast (breast can mean chest generally, but tit is slang for a woman's breast). Basically, the bottom of your body is going over your top, as if you are rolling over yourself. It means the same as "head over heels", in which your feet go over your head. – nxx Jan 26 '14 at 16:39
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    A similar expression is "tits up", which has similar connotations and would be fine for OP's example. "It's all well and good till the economy goes tits up". – JMB Jan 26 '14 at 16:59
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    I've also heard "Ass over teakettle"; same idea-the image of a person tumbling. I would say that "tit's up" is different, that that implies a dead person lying on her back. – swbarnes2 Jan 27 '14 at 18:15

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