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Let's say my hometown used to be the number 1 in terms of cleanliness, but now we are third in ranking. Then I say:

"We're not number 1 anymore, we got demoted by 2 and now in number 3 in ranking."

Or

"We're not number 1 anymore, we went down by 2 and now in number 3 in ranking."

Are these a correct phrasing?

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I would say the second option makes more sense than the first. Demoted is generally something that happens as a direct punishment for an action. Personally, I would phrase it as:

We're not number 1 anymore. We dropped two spots to number 3.

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    I hope you don't mind the edit, but I think that the word "two" should be spelled out, to avoid confusion between the ranking spots (1 and 3), and the number of spots that were dropped.
    – J.R.
    Apr 27 '18 at 14:27
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"We're not number 1 anymore. We were demoted by two, and are now in number 3 ranking."

J.R. is correct that spelling out the number 2 helps to avoid confusion. Your sentence is a run-on sentence and should be separated. The comma is required to show two separate thoughts joined in a single sentence, and the "are" is required to be grammatically correct to show your new state of being.

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    Oh wow thx so much for the grammar tip there! That's a top notch advice hehe
    – John Arvin
    Apr 27 '18 at 16:29
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    Also, what if your ''we were demoted by two'' is changed into the prev. ''We got demoted by two''?
    – John Arvin
    Apr 27 '18 at 16:31
  • It's acceptable. Got is just a bit more informal in English. I prefer a more formal approach unless I'm trying to be more relaxed and casual in my writing. It's really just preference. Cheers! Apr 27 '18 at 18:49
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The often used phrasing to describe rankings is:

John Arvin's #1 hometown fell two spots this week to number 3.
Whereas #2 and #3 each gained a spot in this week's rankings.

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