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I encountered a sentence in a paper.

Stock-market participation has also been found to be increasing in household education. One interpretation is that education reduces the fixed costs of participating, by making it easier for would-be investors to understand the market’s risk–reward trade-offs, to deal with the mechanics of setting up an account, and executing trades, etc.

While it's well known that a lot of scholarship is produced by non-native English speakers in the academia, this paper was penned by people who appear to be native speakers. (I could include the title and the authors' names if necessary).

I thought it should be increasing with, because it seems the authors are saying stock-market participation increases as household education increases. Googling "increasing in" only gives me results along the lines of "Antibiotic use is rapidly increasing in developing countries." Is the original sentence correct?

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    No, the quoted sentence is not well-written. You are correct that it should say "increasing with".
    – J. Taylor
    Apr 30 '18 at 5:52
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It depends what you want to say

Stock-market participation has also been found to be increasing with household education.

Describes a relationship between the amount or level of education already in a household and the amount of investing, e.g. college education, high school graduate.

Whereas

Stock-market participation has also been found to be increasing in household education.

Can mean that in the household education that is currently going on, the amount of investing is increasing, e.g. webinars, MOOCs.

Keeping in mind that continuing education will itself raise the household education level.

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