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Consider something like you want to transfer from school A to school B.

Now consider the following:

  1. You can change the school if you have the admission from the school B.
  2. You can change the schools if you have the admission from the school B.

I heard the plural form when two people were talking. I am actually not sure which one is correct or if both are correct, or what's the difference, or why they used the plural form.

1 Answer 1

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The action of changing involves both schools, so:

You can change schools if you have the admission from the school B.

I wouldn't use "have the admission". Better might be "if you can be admitted to school B", "met the admission requirements of school B", or such.

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  • Thanks, it's interesting. By "having" the admission I meant having the admission letter though or admission offer or something like that.
    – Cardinal
    Commented May 1, 2018 at 2:27
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    "You can change schools if you have an admission letter from school B." makes sense.
    – user3169
    Commented May 1, 2018 at 2:30

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