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To me:

'Bad case of (an ailment)'

sounds anything and everything that is either the direct result of an ailment; for example:

I have a bad case of the flu.

would cover other symptoms that might accompany it in a given case (i.e, headache, sore throat, body aches, etc.) Is that right?

Whereas if I said:

I am trying to get over the flu.

means I am doing my best to recover from it. Correct?

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I would say that is somewhat correct. Context is important for those two phrases. Typically, if I heard "I have a bad case of the flu," I would assume they are very sick. As in, unable to leave the couch or bed. If someone tells me "I am trying to get over the flu," that generally means they are starting to feel better, but are not at 100% yet. So, in general conversation I might expect the following:

A:Would you like to go to the pub on Friday?

B: I can't. I have a bad case of the flu.

Or:

A: Would you like to go to the pub on Friday?

B: Maybe. I am trying to get over the flu, can I get back to you on Thursday?

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