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As a 13-year-old in a boarding school, I would sit in my dorm room with my friends flipping through old-battered copies of Vogue, talking about how one day we would all be featured in the magazine.

Could we place "flipping" in the sentence without using conjunction in between the two sentences. If there is any particular reason please explain me properly.

Here is a screenshot with more context:

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    Please don't post pictures of text. Pictures can't be searched or indexed, and they're unfriendly to users with vision problems or on slow internet connections. Also, is there some reason you couldn't have typed in the single sentence you were curious about? Anyway, I replaced the image with text for you. – stangdon May 3 '18 at 15:26
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    flipping....Vogue is not a separate sentence but a non-finite clause headed with the present participle. It's comparable to We sat, reading our textbooks in silence. The same is true for talking...magazine. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 3 '18 at 15:40
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    To echo what @stangdon said, I don't mind seeing an image when it helps to provide more context. However, the sentence you are asking about should always be typed into the question. – J.R. May 3 '18 at 15:43
  • So flipping is a gerund ? And I think there should be a comma in between friends and flipping – Ahmed May 3 '18 at 16:24
  • I would say that flipping is a present participle, but there is not much difference here. A comma is not necessary in constructions like "We sat flipping". – stangdon May 3 '18 at 16:28
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As a 13-year-old in a boarding school, I would sit in my dorm room with my friends flipping through old-battered copies of Vogue, talking about how one day we would all be featured in the magazine.

The best explanation I can give is that sometimes the rules of compound sentences are disregarded in creative writing to indicate that everything is happening at once and to recreate the feeling of a "stream of thoughts" rather than a carefully constructed sentence.

For example, if it had read:

As a 13-year-old in a boarding school, I would sit in my dorm room with my friends flipping through old-battered copies of Vogue, and talking about how one day we would all be featured in the magazine.

This reads like 3 separate activities that did not necessarily all take place at the same time; in other words when the writer was 13, sometimes he would sit in his room with his friends flipping through Vogue, and sometimes talking about featuring in the magazine.

What the writer is trying to convey is that all of this would happen at the same time - they would talk while they were looking through the magazines. This is why there are no conjunctions breaking up the sentence.

Likewise there is no comma before 'flipping' because again this would imply a list of consecutive activities and the predicate "flipping through old battered copies of Vogue" alone would not be grammatically correct as it lacks a subject.

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In this sentence, neither "flipping" nor "talking" are gerunds, because they are not functioning as nouns. They are the heads of participle phrases that are functioning in an adverbial role. (They are a form of reduced adverbial clause.)

The full meaning of this sentence if it used full adverbial clauses would be the following (with irrelevant parts of the sentence omitted for brevity):

We sat in my dorm room while we flipped through pages while we talked.

Usually, when you form a reduced adverbial clause, you put in the adverb:

I want to finish my homework before going out to play.

However, when the adverb is while, it is often elided, as well. Here are a few examples of this construction where the omitted adverb is while:

He went running down the street, shouting.
She turned away smiling.
They stood watching the disaster.
They came bearing gifts.

Because it's serving in an adverbial role, no comma is required, and a conjunction would make the sentences grammatically incorrect.

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