0

Having been chased by street dogs once, he doesn't dare to take that path.

An example relating to "___ (tell) many times, he still made the same mistakes" form http://forum.wordreference.com/threads/having-been-done-done.3333057/

I don't think you need both once and having been, together. They seem to have similar functions. That's why B doesn't sound good.

An explanation to "Once ______ a difficult and even dangerous place to visit, it is now a friendly destination that welcomes visitors from all over the world" from https://www.usingenglish.com/forum/threads/247926-quot-Done-quot-or-quot-Having-been-done-quot

Is it suitable to use "having been done" and "once" together?

What's your opinion on

Once ______ a difficult and even dangerous place to visit, it is now a friendly destination that welcomes visitors from all over the world.

A. considered B. having been considered

relative: What are the differences between "having been done" and "done"?

  • 1
    once is fine. Another person might have been chased many times. The sentence means "once was enough" to convince him to take another path. once there refers to a chasing incident. In the second sentence, once means formerly. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 6 '18 at 13:56
  • having been done is a passive construction, having done is active voice. Having been painted, the house looked fresh. Having painted the house, he turned to other tasks. – Tᴚoɯɐuo May 6 '18 at 14:09
0

Once a popular tourist destination, the seaside resort became a ghost-town when sewage and medical waste started washing up on its beach.

Once = formerly.

Now consider this adage:

Once bitten, twice shy.

Once = one time

After a dog bites you, you're doubly wary of dogs. Figuratively it applies to any situation where you can suffer some unhappy consequence. If you experience the bad outcome once, you will be extra wary of such situations in the future.

| improve this answer | |

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.