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Could you tell me what the meaning of shredding my thoughts is in the following context?

The complete phrase is

I had only a few seconds to wonder why before the needles returned, shredding my thoughts

It's included in this text:

I AWOKE WITH NEEDLES in my brain. Thousands of them, biting, blocking out everything. Then they disappeared for one dizzying moment and I got my bearings. It was morning, early; amber sunlight poured in through my bedroom window. I was standing but not on my own strength. Two hands were gripping my throat, and they’d been shaking me. The needles, that was my brain crashing into my skull. I had only a few seconds to wonder why before the needles returned, shredding my thoughts. My eyes were open but I saw only white flashes. A few sounds made it through to me. “SLUT!” “WHORE!” Then another sound. Mother. She was crying. “Stop! You’re killing her! Stop!”

Educated by Tara Westover

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According to Cambridge Dictionary

to shred

to cut or tear something roughly into thin strips

It's a metaphor. She got only seconds to wonder because the pain caused by the needles didn't let she think. Her thoughts were shredded, abruptly interrupted by the pain.

EDITED due to OP's doubts - Taken from @Andrew's comment:

needles is a common metaphor to describe a severe sharp, stabbing pain. Pins would be less intense (because pins are shorter than needles). You will also see "pins and needles" to describe the sensation of something like when your foot starts to "wake up" after it "falls asleep" (from lack of blood flow)

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    @Peace I think that it's a methaphor too, no real needles were being inserted in her skull. "Then they disappeared for one dizzying moment" – RubioRic May 16 '18 at 12:42
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    @Peace I think that she may have a migraine, "a recurrent throbbing headache" – RubioRic May 16 '18 at 12:57
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    @Peace when her brother dragged her through the room and threw her to the ground, she most likely hit her head. "the needles" is the pain she's experiencing, speaking metaphorically again. She goes on to describe that it's not a common headache but rather her brain physically hurting due to the impact. – Levyce May 16 '18 at 12:57
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    @Peace "needles" is a common metaphor to describe a severe sharp, stabbing pain. "Pins" would be less intense (because pins are shorter than needles). You will also see "pins and needles" to describe the sensation of something like when your foot starts to "wake up" after it "falls asleep" (from lack of blood flow) – Andrew May 16 '18 at 14:34
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    @dan there are so many creative ways writers can manipulate the language for effect that I could not possibly give examples of all of them. The best thing to do is to read as much as possible and get used to different writer's styles. Side note: I don't think much of this particular writer's style. To me it seems overly dramatic, among other problems. But that's really up to individual taste. – Andrew May 16 '18 at 23:04

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