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Can we say these in situations where I am like angry?

"Tell me wherever you are from" (here I want to learn where the person I am talking to is from)

"Tell me whatever your name is" (here I want to learn the name of the person I am talking to)

"Tell me whoever you are" (here I want to learn who he is)

"Tell me however you did it" (here I want to learn how he did it)

Can we also say these?

"You can't even tell me wherever you are from" (here I want to tell that person he can't even tell me where he is from)

"You can't even tell me whatever your name is" (here I want to tell that person he can't even tell me what his name is)

"You can't even tell me whoever you are" (here I want to tell that person he can't even tell me who he is)

"You can't even tell me however you did it" (here I want to tell that person he can't even tell me how he did it)

I guess we can not use these words "whatever", "whoever", "wherever" and "however" in those ways above.

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The "-ever" form is not appropriate here. Just say "Tell me where you are from", NOT "Tell me wherever you are from".

If you just drop the "ever" from each of your sentences, they are all valid, and the sort of thing a fluent speaker would say.

"Wherever", "whoever", etc are used to refer to an unknown person, place, etc. That is, you might say, "Whoever stole my lunch was a real jerk." "Wherever I go, I will always remember you." Etc. But if you're asking a question where you presumably hope to actually learn the identify, you use the plain "who", "what", "where", and "how" forms. "Who are you?" "Where are you from?"

In both cases, I suppose, the person (or whatever) is unknown, but you use "who" to ask a question, "whoever" to express the "unknownness".

  • Thanks. Can't I use those sentences in a situation where I don't care much about where he is from, who he is etc.? Like in a rude way. – Fire and Ice May 17 '18 at 15:35
  • @DereMemo - Are you saying that you are trying to be rude? – J.R. May 17 '18 at 15:44
  • The -ever forms are just not used in a question like this. If you don't care who the person is, you could certainly express that with a statement using "whoever". Like, "Whoever you are, get out of here now!" You could make a grammatically correct sentence that includes the word "whoever" and also asks "who", but I can't think of an example that makes sense. "Whoever you are, who are you?" If you don't care who it is, why are you asking? But maybe I'm just not being creative enough to think of a good example. – Jay May 17 '18 at 15:47
  • @J.R. There are certainly times when a person tries to be rude. Like when he's angry at someone. – Jay May 17 '18 at 15:48
  • @Jay Why can't I for example say "Tell me whatever your name is" while I can say "Tell me whatever you want to say"? Again, as you said, I am talking about saying "Tell me whatever your name is" with an angry tone. – Fire and Ice May 17 '18 at 16:01

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