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I'm wondering if we have two adverbs in English in the basic case below:

Knowing a patient's medical history enables a health provider

  1. to detect a patient's medical problems more accurately

  2. to solve a patient's medical problems more efficiently

​In this case if I want to put point 1. and 2. in one sentence, is it relevant for me to put it:

I> Knowing a patient's medical history enables a health provider TO more accurately detect and more efficiently solve a patient's medical problems.

or II> Knowing a patient's medical history enables a health provider TO more accurately detect and TO more efficiently solve a patient's medical problems.

  • The 2nd to is optional. Another possibility is to write: Knowing a patient's medical history enables a health provider to detect a patient's medical problems more accurately and (to) solve them more efficiently. It avoids the split infinitive, if that matters to you. – Ronald Sole May 20 '18 at 15:53
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If you have multiple to-infinitives joined by a common conjunction, like and or or, you do not have to use to again after the first. You can, if you want, but you don't have to. It's a matter of style (which it perhaps to say 'opinion') which is better.

You are splitting the infinitives, but people do that all the time, so I wouldn't worry about it.

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